Success: Prolonged Definition Dissertation

Accomplishment

What is success? Is it the doing a process and receiving a good result satisfactory amongst the community, or would it be simply reaching ones personal goals? Accomplishment to me could mean many things. Although I are successful at school, that does not necessarily mean I will lead a successful existence.

According to The American Heritage Book success can be, " the achievement of something desired, planned, or perhaps attempted. " Even over the course of history, the meaning of the phrase has not actually changed. In the Webster's Dictionary from 1828, success was stated since, " the favorable or productive termination of anything experimented with; a termination which answers the purpose intended; properly in a good sense, yet often within a bad perception. "

The word accomplishment itself has a interesting history. First utilized in 1537, the phrase was produced from Latin. Be successful entered English language in the fifteenth century by Old French succeder, which will itself originated in Latin succedere. That phrase is a mixture verb shaped from sub- " under" in the sense of " next under" or perhaps " following, " and cedere " go. " The meaning of " getting near to something" changed in Latin to " succeeding, prospering, " hence this is behind success.

Success in my experience is establishing personal goals, and following through with them. Whether you accomplish your wanted result or perhaps not, you have succeeded by simply trying. " It is not the critic whom counts; not really the man whom points out the way the strong man stumbled, or where the doer of actions could have completed better. The credit belongs to the man that is actually in the arena; who's face can be marred simply by dust, perspire, and blood vessels; who aims valiantly; who also errs and comes up short again and again; who knows the truly great enthusiasms, the fantastic devotions, and spends him self in a deserving cause; who have at the best knows ultimately the success of high achievements; and whom, at worst, if perhaps he does not work out, at least fails while daring significantly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls...



This article is a figure analysis of Frodo Baggins from the book, «The Master Of The Bands: The Fellowship Of The Ring, » by J. L. R Tolkien.

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